Can we talk about my ADHD problem?

Can we talk about my ADHD problem?

Thank God for the tab icons, otherwise I’d really have no clue what half of these tabs even are without clicking on them, and thus getting sucked into opening more tabs.

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HTML for Newbs

I learned to use Adobe Dreamweaver about three years ago, and I made this horrifically terrible website about my apartment and the house rules and my roommates. I hope nobody ever finds it. 

Anyway, now, I’m teaching myself HTML, so I can utilize Dreamweaver in a helpful way to make really awesome websites, and mainly, a site for the company I work for in Philly. I’m using HTML, XHTML, & CSS All-in-One For Dummies®, 2nd Edition, and this is what I learned in the first ten minutes:Image

I may have squealed a little in the library at Temple University (my almost alma mater), and I’m not even embarrassed.

#girlswholikepinkaresmarttoo 

 

I love Barbie, but……

Please, don’t get me wrong. I LOVE Barbie, and I don’t think she’s as terrible as everyone makes her out to be.

However, sometimes I think the Barbie/Mattel marketing team just TRYS to make her to be as stereotypical as possible.

For instance, isn’t there ANYTHING else they could have made one of these boxes other than something stereotypically vain?

When I moved, I had multiple boxes for my shoes and at least two make up/bathroom/hair boxes. But I also had two huge boxes for all my textbooks and fiction book and reference books. I also had an athletics box with my yoga mat and weights and workout/dance videos. Plus boxes of photos and memories, another for my previous school work, and another for all my art supplies.

Couldn’t they give at least one box for Books or School Stuff?

Were they asking for people to complain about how vapid and vain Barbie is?

Like I said, I love Barbie and her fashion and 100 million careers, and I think she is a decent one of many other role models, but COME ON, marketing team.

Sheesh.

First visit to the comic book store with The B Team

Almost ten years ago, my best friend and I were obsessed with Sailor Moon. We would play pretend, of course; I was Sailor Moon and she was Sailor Jupiter. Now, I know for a fact that we both looked positively ridiculous pretending to float in the air and dance and turn into these awesome girls who kicked ass and allowed justice to prevail, but it was some of the best fun I have had – and will probably ever have. 

Her mom drove us to one of the malls in town one day and we bought our first set of Sailor Moon card game packs together. Part of that memory includes my mom’s thoughts on that “place” being dirty and weird, so I never went back, and thought comics were, like, totally weird. 

Between then and now, I’ve seen plenty of comic book superhero movies like Batman, Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, etc., and they were all fine and dandy, but it wasn’t until I saw The Watchmen a few years ago on a very long plane ride, when I kinda-sorta-didn’t-want-to-admit-to-myself that I was really into comics and super heroes, and maybe even kinda-sorta-wished-I-was-one. It was dark and emotional and plot heavy, and I was completely drawn into it. 

Since working at Indy Hall – the coolest, nerdiest place in town, I’ve felt more and more free to like things that I actually enjoy, like video games and comics and coding, and other things that are stereotypically male activities that I figured I wouldn’t be able to do without being laughed at.

Nonetheless, on a whim last night, I spent the entire evening after work watching Captain America, Thor, The Avengers, and finished up with Justice League DOOM. 

Done. I made up my mind, and I was going to the comic book store the day after. After some shop talk with the guys (and girl) at Indy (The B Team) that go to the comic book store (Brave New Worlds in Old City), here’s what I got to start with:

Image

 

Can’t. Wait. 

My “it” wall.

I’ve always loved the idea of inspiration boards and books. I was even a Pintrest fiend for a week or two. Now, I’ve taken the idea to a much bigger place.

I rent in the city, and I have classic, bare white walls, on which I can’t mount any actual artwork without worrying about a hefty loss to my security deposit return come spring. Plus, I’m sleeping on a mattress on a futon, because I can’t afford a big girl bed yet, so I don’t have a nice headboard or anything. Gotta love being 20-something in Philly ❤

Nonetheless, I always find light at the end of a tunnel, and now, I have this awesome inspiration wall – my “It” wall, if you will – to give me inspiration 24/7 and give life to my tini-tiny apartment.

I subscribe to Harper’s Bazaar, Elle Decor, The New Yorker, and Wired (I may not be a journalism student any more, but I will never let my love for magazines burn out), so I’ll be updating my wall whenever I find interesting things that I like, or want to remember.

Does anyone else do something similar for inspiration? How about funky ways to make a “cozy” apartment more lively?

City Living = No Cars Allowed

Today, I read that Philadelphia is the sixth best city to live in without a car.

(If you click that link, you’ll see that of the ten cities listed, gas is a whopping average of just under $4/gallon. HOLYSHYT.)

I live in Philly without a vehicle, so biking and bussing are my two main modes of transportation, besides walking. My list of complaints regarding SEPTA and taxis goes on and on, but overall, navigating Philly without a car is relatively easy.

Of course, NYC comes in at number one, and I’ve used their subway system about two dozen times in my life. It definitely fits the bill, and I still can’t comprehend why anyone bothers with a car there. Although confusing to many tourists at first, their system will get anyone anywhere around town.

I was a bit surprised that Philly came in just under 10% of the population using public transit, but then again, I wonder how this info would differ if they included biking. Technically, that’s one more mode of transportation other than a car, and I know biking is huge in Philadelphia. This data seems to mostly calculate by use of public transportation.

Great food for thought, though.